Matthew Chapter 25

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The Parable of the Ten Virgins
  1. “At that time, the kingdom of the heavens will be like ten virgins who, after taking their lamps, went out to meet the bridegroom.
  2. “Now, five of them were foolish and five were prudent,
  3. “for the foolish took their lamps but didn’t take oil with them.
  4. “But the wise took oil in flasks with their lamps.
  5. “And while the bridegroom was delaying, they all became drowsy and were sleeping.
  6. “But in the middle of the night, a great cry began: “Behold the bridegroom!  Go out to meet him!”
  7. “Then all those virgins arose and trimmed their lamps.
  8. “And the foolish said to the prudent; “Give us some of your oil, because our lamps have gone out.”[1]literally “are gone out”, as the Greek verb here is in the present tense.
  9. “But the prudent answered, saying; “No. There definitely isn’t[2]“definitely isn’t”. In Greek, this is a double negative (no, not) to add emphasis. Since English double negatives cancel each other out (instead of adding emphasis) the word “definitely” was added to keep the emphatic sense of the Greek. enough for us and you. Instead, go to the men who sell oil and buy it for yourselves.”
  10. “But while they were going away to buy oil, the bridegroom came.  And the virgins who were ready[3]“the virgins who were ready ” is literally “the ready”, with “the” in the feminine form standing in for a feminine pronoun.  The Greek word translated “ready” more fully means “ready because prepared”, and thus could be translated “prepared” here. entered into the wedding feast with him, and the door was shut.
  11. “And later the remaining virgins also came, saying; “Lord, lord; open for us.”
  12. “But answering, he said; “Truly I tell you: I didn’t – and don’t – know you.”
  13. “Therefore, keep watch because you didn’t – and don’t – know the day nor the hour [in which the Son of Man comes].
The Parable of the Talents
  1. “For it’s just like a man traveling to a foreign country, who called his own slaves and handed over his possessions to them.
  2. “And indeed, he gave five talents[4]A “talent” is not a coin but a measure of weight. It was about 75lbs, or 3000 silver shekels in weight. A talent of silver was worth about 6,000 denarii, which was the going rate for a day’s worth of unskilled labor. to one, and two to another, and one to another; to each according to their own ability.  And at once he traveled to a foreign country.
  3. “And going out, the man who received five talents traded with them and gained another five.
  4. “Likewise, the man with two gained another two.
  5. “But departing, the man who received one talent dug a hole in the ground and hid his master’s silver.
  6. “Then after much time passed, the master of those slaves came and settled accounts with them.
  7. “And approaching him, the man who received five talents brought another five talents, saying; “Master, you handed me five talents. Behold, I have gained another five talents.”
  8. “His master was telling him; “Well done good and faithful slave.  You were faithful over a few things; I will set you over many. Enter into the joy of your master.”
  9. “Then approaching him, the man with two talents said; “Master, you handed me two talents.  Behold, I have gained another two.
  10. “His master was telling him; “Well done good and faithful slave.  You were faithful over a few things; I will set you over many. Enter into the joy of your master.”
  11. “Then approaching him, the man who had received – and still has[5]“had received – and still has –” is one word in Greek, and here it’s in the perfect tense (which is sort of a combination of our past and present tenses).  Normally, it would be translated “had – and still has – received” but that forms a nonsensical sentence in English.  The verb “received” was moved to conform to English rules of grammar. – one talent said; “Master, I know that you’re a harsh man; reaping where you didn’t sow, and gathering where you didn’t scatter seed.”
  12. So being afraid and departing, I hid your talent in the ground. Behold, you have what’s yours.”
  13. “But answering, his master told him; “You wicked and lazy slave!  You had known that I reap where I didn’t sow, and gather where I didn’t scatter seed.
  14. “Therefore, it was proper for you to invest my silver with the bankers, and coming back I would have recovered my money with interest.
  15. “Therefore, take the talent from him and give it to the man who has ten talents.
  16. “For everything will be given to the man who has, and he will have abundance. But for the man who doesn’t have, even what he has will be taken away from him.
  17. “Also, cast out the useless slave into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and grinding of teeth.
The Sheep and the Goats
  1. “And when the Son of Man comes in His glory – and all the angels with Him – then He will sit upon His glorious throne.
  2. “And all the nations will be gathered before Him.  And He will separate them one from another, just as the shepherd separates the sheep from the goats.
  3. “And indeed, He will put the sheep on His right and the goats on the left.
  4. “Then the king will tell those on His right; “Come, you men who were – and are – blessed by My Father.  Inherit the kingdom which was – and is – prepared for you from the foundation of the world.
  5. “For I hungered, and you gave Me something to eat.  I thirsted, and you gave Me a drink.  I was a foreigner, and you were hospitable to Me.
  6. I was naked, and you clothed Me. I was sick, and you visited Me. I was in prison, and you came to Me.”
  7. “Then the righteous will answer Him, saying; “Lord, when did we see you hungering and fed you, or thirsting and gave you a drink?
  8. “And when did we see you as a foreigner and were hospitable, or see you naked and clothed you?
  9. “And when did we see you being sick or in prison and come to you?
  10. “And answering, the King will tell them; “Truly I tell you: whatever[6]Literally “on how much” you did for one of the least of these My brothers, you did for Me.
  11. And then He will tell those on His left; “Depart from Me, you men who were – and are – cursed into the fire of ages,[7]“fire of ages” is literal, though “age-long fire” could be equally accurate. It’s traditionally translated “eternal fire” here, but that’s less literal and “fire of ages” captures the severity of the fire, which the traditional interpretation doesn’t.  Further, the word translated “ages” (αἰώνιον) is merely the adjective form of the Greek word “αἰών” (aion), which is used – for example – in Matthew 24:3 “what are the signs of your coming and the end of the age?”  Virtually all lexicons define αἰών (the noun form) as “age”, but some want to change the adjective form’s meaning to “eternal” instead of “age-long”, “of ages”, or similar. which was – and is – prepared for The Accuser[8]“The Accuser” is literal.  The Greek word used here is “διάβολος” (diabolos), and it’s the root of our English word “devil”. Much like “Christ” (see note on Matt 1:1) “devil” isn’t a name but rather a descriptive title. and his angels.
  12. For I hungered and you didn’t give Me something to eat.  I thirsted, and you didn’t give Me a drink.
  13. I was a foreigner, and you weren’t hospitable; naked, and you didn’t clothe Me; sick and in prison, and you didn’t visit Me.
  14. “And then they will answer, saying; “Lord, when did we see you hungering, or thirsting, or a foreigner, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and didn’t serve you?”
  15. “Then He will answer them, saying; “Truly I tell you: whatever[9]Literally “on how much” you didn’t do for one of the least of these, you didn’t do for Me.
  16. And these will depart into the punishment of ages,[10]“punishment of ages” is literal, though “age-long punishment” could be equally accurate. It’s traditionally translated “eternal punishment” here.  However the word translated “ages” (αἰώνιον) is merely the adjective form of the Greek word “αἰών” (aion), which is used – for example – in Matthew 24:3 “what are the signs of your coming and the end of the age?”  Virtually all lexicons define αἰών (the noun form) as “age”, but some want to change the adjective form’s meaning to “eternal” instead of “age-long”, “of ages”, or similar.  Further, “punishment of ages” captures the severity of the punishment, which the traditional interpretation doesn’t. but the righteous into the life of ages.”[11]“life of ages” is literal, and captures the duration as well as the quality of the life, which the traditional interpretation of “eternal life” doesn’t.  The word translated “ages” (αἰώνιον) is the adjective form of the Greek word “αἰών” (aion), which is used – for example – in Matthew 24:3 “what are the signs of your coming and the end of the age?”  Virtually all lexicons define αἰών (the noun form) as “age”, but some want to change the adjective form’s meaning to “eternal” instead of “age-long” or “of ages”.  This despite “of ages” conveying a similar – and more literally accurate – meaning.

 

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