Matthew Chapter 8

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Jesus heals a leper
  1. When He came down from the mountain, many crowds followed Him.
  2. And behold, a leper[1]A “leper” is a person suffering from “leprosy” (also called “Hansen’s Disease” in modern times).  The disease is caused by the bacteria “M. leprae“.  Symptoms includes the outbreak of unsightly skin sores and nerve damage. It was a great social stigma in the ancient world and remains so to this day in many places.  The Jews believed that leprosy was caused by sin.  Therefore they believed that only the promised messiah would be able to cure leprosy, because only God could forgive sin.  The leper coming to Jesus could be construed as an act of faith on his part. came and was bowing down at His feet, saying; “Lord, if you want to, you have the power to make me clean.”
  3. And reaching out His hand, He touched him saying, “I want to; be cleansed.”  And immediately his leprosy was cleansed.
  4. And Jesus said to Him, “See that you tell no one.  But go; show yourself to the priest and offer the gift that Moses commanded as evidence for them.”
The Centurion’s faith
  1. And when He entered Capernaum, a centurion[2]“centurion” was a rank in the Roman military. A normal centurion was in charge of 80 soldiers, plus ~20 support staff. However, there were different levels of centurion.  The highest ranking centurions could be in charge of up to 1000 men. approached Him.  He was pleading
  2. and saying: “Lord, my servant boy was – and is – lying sick[3]“was – and is – lying sick” is a single word in Greek.  It’s a verb which means “to throw” in the active voice.  In the passive voice here, it means to “be thrown”, which can carry the connotation of being thrown onto a bed because sick.  It’s in the Greek perfect tense here, which is (sort of) a combination of our past and present tenses. in the house.  He is paralyzed and being horribly tormented.
  3. And He said to him: “I will come to heal him.”
  4. But answering, the centurion said; “Lord, I’m not worthy for you to come under my roof.  But only say the word and my servant boy will be healed.
  5. For I’m also a man under authority; and I have soldiers under me.  And I tell this one “Go”, and he goes. And to another “Come”, and he comes.  And to my slave “Do this”, and he does it.”
  6. And hearing this, Jesus marveled and told the men who follow Him; “Truly I tell you; I’ve found no one in Israel besides him with such great faith.
  7. Now, I tell you that many from east and west will arrive.  And they will recline at the table[4]“recline” is literal.  In ancient times, they laid down on a low table to eat. Thus, “reclining” in those days is similar to “sitting down” today to share a meal. with Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob in the kingdom of the heavens.
  8. But the sons of this kingdom[5]literally “the kingdom”.  The word “the” was translated “this” to avoid confusion with the kingdom of the heavens in the previous verse.  In Greek, the difference is made clear by using a different word form (which English can’t do). will be thrown into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and grinding of teeth.
  9. And Jesus said to the centurion, “Go. Let it happen according to your faith.”  And his servant boy was healed in that hour.
Jesus heals many
  1. And when Jesus came to Peter’s house, He saw his mother-in-law was – and is – lying sick with a fever.[6]“with a fever” is literally “fevering”.
  2. And He touched her hand and the fever left her.  And she got up and was serving Him.
  3. Now, when it became evening, they brought Him many who were demon possessed; and He cast out the spirits with a word.  And all those badly afflicted,[7]literally “badly having”. He healed,
  4. so that it might be fulfilled; what was spoken through Isaiah the prophet when he said: “He took our infirmities, and carried away our diseases.”[8]quotation/allusion to Isaiah 53:4
  5. Now, when Jesus saw a great crowd around him, He gave orders to depart to the other side of the sea.
The Cost of following Jesus
  1. And approaching Him, one scribe said: “Teacher; if you go anywhere, I will follow you.”[9]literally “I will follow you anywhere, if you might go.”  Word order changed to conform to English rules of grammar.
  2. And Jesus said to him: “The foxes have dens, and the birds of the air nests.  But the Son of Man has nowhere to lay His head, does He?[10]“does He” was added to keep this sentence in the original rhetorical sense.  (The Greek word “ποῦ” (pou, which means “where?”) in this verse is an interrogative adverb, meaning it’s asking a question.)  Greek can very easily ask negative/rhetorical questions.  English can’t do it as easily, hence the addition of “does he?” to keep the rhetorical sense.
  3. Now, another of His disciples said to Him; “Lord, let me first go and bury my father.”
  4. But Jesus said to him; “Follow me, and let the dead bury the dead by themselves.”[11]Most translations render this “let the dead bury their own dead”.  However, this passage in Greek contains a 3rd person plural reflexive pronoun.  In English reflexive pronouns end with “-self” or “-selves.  The only 3rd person plural reflexive pronoun in English is “themselves”, hence the translation choice.
Jesus Calms the Storm
  1. And when he stepped into the boat, His disciples followed Him.
  2. And behold; a great storm began on the sea, so the boat was covered by the waves. But He was sleeping.
  3. And coming to Him, they woke Him up saying; “Lord, save me! We are dying!”[12]literally “perishing”, in the sense of being completely destroyed.
  4. And He said to them; “Why are you fearful? O, you of little faith?”  Then getting up, He scolded the winds and the sea, and it became very calm.
  5. Then the men marveled, saying; “What kind of man[13]“What kind of man” is one word in Greek.  It can also be mean “from what country/region?”  And in that case is used to inquire about someone’s origins. is this?  Because even the winds and the sea listen to Him.”
Demons sent into pigs
  1. And when He came to the other side – to the land of Gadarenes[14]The Gadarenes lived in the city Gadara, which was south-east of the Sea of Galilee.  It was an important Hellenized (Greek) city, and one of the ten cities of the Decapolis. – two demon possessed men come out of the tombs to meet Him.  They were very violent, so no one could pass through that way.
  2. And behold, they shrieked,[15]This Greek word comes from the shriek of a raven. saying; “What are we to you, Son of God?  Did you come here to torment us before the appointed time?”
  3. Now, far away from them was a large herd of pigs, who were feeding.
  4. So the demons were begging Him, saying; “If you cast us out, send us into the herd of pigs.”
  5. And He said to them “Go.”  So they came out and went into the pigs.  And behold; the whole herd dashed down the steep bank into the sea, and died in the waters.
  6. Now, the men feeding them fled.  And going into the city, they reported everything; even about the demon-possessed men.
  7. And behold; the whole city went out to meet Jesus. And seeing Him, they begged Him to depart from their region.[16]literally “they begged so that He might depart away from their region.”

 

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